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TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

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Morocco


I've been having other considerations about surviving TEOTWAWKI [TEOMCROTE] on Gomera. First let me state that i'm only talking about the Canary island of La Gomera, not other Canary islands. La Gomera (which i only learned when i got there) has been inactive for 2 million years. Flora and fauna on the island are unique because they also go back that far. Gomera, uniquely, harbors flora that dates back to times that Europe was much warmer but on the European mainland such flora has been dead for ages; it is only still thriving on the Canary islands, perhaps even seeded from Gomera. Which also begs the question, how did all those species of plants die out completely on the European mainland? The so-called scientists all just present that as fact, but whole ecosystems don't just die off.
 
Anyway, apparently La Gomera has been safe for 2 million years. The surrounding islands are not. La Palma, El Hierro, and Tenerife surround Gomera, Tenerife only a 35 minute ferry away; 32km, i believe. La Gomera is also the only island that still has an ancient forrest in tact, it's also the only island with a year-round river. It is at a safe distance from the active volcanoes in the region.
 
I was on the island for 5 months. Then the girl i was with decided to kill herself by moving to the USA... This has been a steep learning curve for me, as i trusted that she would not choose to leave the island with all of the knowledge about 2012 that she had, but she did it anyway. Her choice also cost me dearly because i was counting on her continued participation. I also was in contact with a British family, with 2 boys, but they too deemed surviving too much of a hassle and went back to the UK, even though they admitted it was to die together. People will not choose to live per se. There's a lot to get in the way of the survival instinct. I admit that i underestimated how bad it was, for i understand much about what lies at the root of desperation and psychological trauma. However, that people would opt to die even though they understand the choices they face, even though it ALSO means the death of their children, that hadn't yet dawned on me 2 years ago. Why should it? I wouldn't. But now i know better and it's part of the message i have to share in the book i'm working on. When it's finished, together with the website and video presentation, i will simply offer it for free to anybody interested in reading it.
 
The new considerations i've been having recently have to do with possibly doing certain preparations on the African mainlain, i.e. in Morocco. My wife is Moroccan and i have connections there to help out. Certain preparations could be done in Morocco, both on the coast and at a safe altitude, and other preparations could be made on La Gomera. Then, after TSHTF certain people and supplies could head to La Gomera because it'll be safe there. I'm considering this not because riding out 2012 would be safer in Morocco but because a lot of preparatory work can be done better, easier, and more cheaply in Morocco.
LaViolette explains that there will be a 3 day period during which gamma radiation is extremely dangerous, then a 3 month period during which radiation from the galactic center (i.e. Sagittarius) should be avoided, i.e. when Sagittarius is overhead, 12 hours in the day. During this time it would be necessary to safeguard all flora and fauna we wish to save for the future. That means watering the plants and animals, bringing the plants out into the sunlight when possible, etc. That suggests a pretty large bunker and other facilities. That kind of building just isn't going to be possible at the safe altitudes on La Gomera. (I'll get into that more later on.)
On La Gomera one could build up a supply of heavy stores: rice and other seed, machinery, glass, good soil, etc. etc. etc. Cover it all in planks and pour a decent layer of concrete over it all for later. Hell, that doesn't even have to be at a safe altitude if it can withstand the mega tsunamis.
Meanwhile, opportunities for building in Morocco are cheap and abundant. We don't even need prime realestate! Any stupid undesired strip of desert would do as long as there's a decent way to get from there back to the coast. At the coast one might then build some underground storage in which zodiacs and maybe even a sailboat can be stored. After TSHTF we all come down to the coast, load in the flora and fauna and head out to La Gomera. Frankly, i'd like to go with the Gomera destination, though if one were less paranoid, Gran Canaria, El Hierro, La Palma, or Tenerife might also do well. There are, however, a number of reasons to choose La Gomera, despite the fact that it's further from Morocco:
- it's not "despite", it's BECAUSE it's further away.
- La Gomera is the only island with a year-round river (El Cedro).
- historically it has been extremely defensible; they even thwarted the Spanish (for 100 years) when all other islands had been subjugated.
- it's cliff coasts make it an undesirable locale for any refugees or settlers
- future generations, 12000 years from now, would be served by a Gomeran settlement
- it's rugged terrain have kept conquerors from even bothering with it
 
You can see from the above that my planning also takes the short, long, and extreme long term into account. Hell, if my genes wind up in almost all of future mankind, why shouldn't i?! ;-)
 
For now, La Gomera poses certain problems; getting anything to it other than livestock that's already on the island will pose a huge legal problem. Same for any noneuropean folk. We could arrange a locale at a probable safe altitude but because of the rugged terrain it would be hard to build at all and there are no decently large opportunities for extensive bunkers (like would be possible in Morocco).
There are a lot of supplies that can be arranged cheaply and easily in Morocco but getting them to Gomera would mean a major logistical and financial feat and even then it would pose a large problem taking care of any greater collection of flora and fauna. The island just isn't empty enough yet...
 
I've been giving it further thought: how to even get down from a safe altitude toward the coast after TSHTF when all roads have been washed away by mega tsunamis? See the jpg's below.
There are other bright sides to the Moroccan option though: the Atlas mountains run all the way to the coast and end right next to Agadir, the most English oriented city in Morocco, large, and catering to English tourists and expats alike. (The rest of the country is either French or Spanish oriented.) My wife informs me that the locals, often Amazigh/Berber, are honest and friendly people to deal with.
Agadir is not too far from where the Canaries lie across from Africa [Agadir - Gomera would be 900-1000km] and that's just good luck. Just as an example, things like olive trees can be had in Morocco for a few cents a piece, something unimaginable in Spain/the Canaries. It also means people and trades are afforable and might be induced to come along (if for no other reason than that they find themselves alive after 2012 in a land in ruins). Tradespeople, professionals, and maybe even friends & family might be seduced to spending Xmas 2012 in Agadir/a mountain location, who knows?
 
If we head by boat to San Sebastian (across from Tenerife) or Hermigua post 2012, we have a decent level piece of ground on La Gomera at our disposal and a climate that ranges between 20 and 30 degrees centigrade all year round. (Felix explains that after the coming of the next ice age, this will not change.) I myself would prefer to go to higher ground directly or not too long thereafter, if only because SOMEONE has to, for the safety of future generations [avoiding raiding parties], for my own safety, as well as for the forrest up there. My idea would be that communications all over the island need to be established asap, including roads or whatever other kinds of transportation can be set up; that's part of the foundation of civilization, something i've given much thought years ago. Such considerations, however, involve MANKIND's future, not necessarily or directly the future of those who survived.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 9/14/2014, 2:01 pm


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life among the Amazigh


"Berbers" call themselves Amazigh. It basically means "Freemen" (and reminds me of the Fremen in Frank Herbert's Dune books, a people with a culture that reminds one of Arabs or Amazigh [a difference i'll get into momentarily]).
To call the Amazigh "Berbers" is insulting if you think about it. The name comes from the root idea and word meaning "barbarians". It is historically-derived discrimination. So the Arabs are just "Arabs" and the people in the mountains "barbarians"? Disgusting.

The Arabs came with their superior technology and their desire to fight and invaded areas where 'Berber peoples' [they can't all be called Amazigh] lived. In many 'Arabic nations' Arabs and Berber peoples live side-by-side. However, in many cases the Amazigh outnumber Arabs many times over. (I believe in Algeria 95% of the people are 'Berber'.)

The Arabs in Morocco have historically formed an aristocratic elite that have shunned and culled Amazigh people from office. Arabs held positions of power and offered only other Arabs other positions. This remains the reality to this day.

The king of Morocco today appears sympathetic to the Amazigh cause and since a few years the Amazigh are ALLOWED to teach their own language and script in public schools. This is a very recent development.
The official attitude of the government [and hence the cultural attitude of most Arabs] is that the Amazigh are an inferior minority.
Ironically, not only are the Amazigh a MAJORITY, they are in many way superior to Arabs.

Amazigh are culturally, socially, and genetically distinct from Arabs. I find it easy to see in their faces [just from TV] that they are a fundamentally different people than the Arabs in Morocco.
[David Icke says there are many 'Reptilians' in Morocco; i've known about this (i.e. his opinion in this matter) for years and i've come to believe it is about the aristocratic Arabic families in Morocco. I have first-hand experience with such people and the percentage of inhuman (culturally usually referred to as "sick") people i've run into is unlike anything i've ever seen.]

There IS a wonderful side effect of this political attitude: Amazigh HATE the Moroccan government, they hate governmental officials, and they mistrust governmental initiatives.
Sounds like a people i can work with... emoticon

Many Amazigh villages in the Atlas mountains have very limited resources. Often they have no electricity, medical care, or proper schooling,, let alone internet [i.e. knowledge of how to use a computer, knowledge of English, or access to hardware].

In recent years there have developed a number of Amazigh families that have enormous economical power despite that (the Arabic) banks have systematically denied Amazigh the opportunities that Arabs enjoy. Parallel to Arabic culture the Amazigh have developed into an economical force that the modern government is becoming forced to deal with.
This serves to illustrate how serious the divide is. At the same time, however, Arabic and Amazigh peoples and language are intertwined to such a degree that Moroccan culture is unique in the Arab world.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 2/8/2012, 1:49 pm


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my new Moroccan destination


Contrary to general ideas that i may have had about Morocco in the past, it appears that they have a number of rather large national parks that are forrested. If you consider my post under LOCATIONS, relocating, ,offset=0#post1707]abandoned locations, you'll read my considerations about the feasibility of setting up a facility under such conditions.
The place i've learned about has the lowest population density of the country (except for the outright deserts). There's also a place there with the name in the local dialect that translates to "caves" emoticon
So there's:
- caves
- high mountains that supply water
- forrest
- privacy
- good distance from the coast
- a mountainous area in between the coast and there
- at an altitude of around 1400 (itself)
A 4-wheel-drive would be necessary to even get near the area [also a plus!]. A location needs to be scouted that can provide reliable water, as well as offering privacy and tactical needs. I hope to head there very soon.
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Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 12/19/2013, 2:30 pm


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Tamazight & Amazigh (or the Imazighen)


]Videos on learning Tamazight. Nothing spoken [strange as that may be] but a lot of basics.

]Good introductory article on the Imazighen

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 5/1/2013, 9:53 pm


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caves


][sign in to see URL]

#!/][sign in to see URL]#!/

Taferdouste
Les mille et une grottes du royaume is a nice series of Moroccan caves. They show the environment, the people, and go into the caves. French of course but otherwise quite nice. This is the only episode i found on YouTube. Perhaps others can be found somewhere online.

]A few vids on the Win Timdouine caves near Agadir.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 8/27/2013, 10:25 am


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politics


]This Map Shows How Welcoming the U.S. Is to Foreigners, Compared to the World
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The friendliest countries in the world toward foreign visitors are Iceland, New Zealand, and Morocco ... and the U.S. ranks really, really low.

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Re: Morocco


]Friouatto: Moroccan villagers protect precious cave
Moroccans have worked hard to preserve one of Morocco's most astounding gems, the Friouato caves, ever since Frenchman Norbert Castoret discovered the geological wonders roughly 80 years ago.
Villagers are still working to maintain the cave, even though the 1998 expansion of the nearby Tazekka National Park put the area under the oversight of the Department of Waters and Forests. The department has not taken over cave upkeep because of a lack of resources.
The largest geological formation of its kind in North Africa, Friouato Cave descends 272 metres underground. Only [sign in to see URL] of its as-yet-unknown total length have been explored. The cave dazzles visitors with an amazing array of sights, from a towering grotto lit only by fragmented rays of light, to a passage less than a metre wide that leads into huge underground caverns decorated with shimmering walls and surreal rock formations.
Since 1932, the village has extensively outfitted the cave, creating a blasted-through entrance granting easy access for visitors, along with concrete steps that line the first kilometre and a system of emergency lights.
"I've been a guide for six years, and it's still exciting every time I go into the cave," said Jamal 'Jambo' Bouabi, 20. According to him, the cave welcomes around 50 visitors each day.
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i'm outta here


if you like, come join me in Tetouan

hendrikzaad at gmail com
0031 6 17494667

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 5/5/2015, 7:05 am


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