Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo

TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)


Page:  1  2 

 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
agricultural basics


--Log in or sign up to see linked image content--
A typical traditional use of water: limited agriculture determined by the natural flow of water.


Water is life. It seems so simple but in areas where water's abundant, it's easy to forget. These are, however, not generally the places to survive/prepare for TEOTWAWKI.

Bringing water to areas where there is none, is one of the things that permaculture is about. Following the naturally set course of water and just allowing that to limit the use of land is (as i see it) like living like a goat. Permaculture is about rising above nature and tradition and bringing intelligence into agricultural practice.

If there are a few basic such principles and practices one might add to 'goatish' living, one might consider:
- ]hydraulic ram pumps
- ]seawater fertilization
- MMS (,offset=10]CDS)
- ]woodgas stove
- the use of wet-pots
- foggage farming

and many more! Things like to make an Egyptian well, ]wetpot irrigation, or making ]hempcrete [coincidentally all Egyptian in origin] are all ancient, cheap, easy techniques that require little investment, no (special) schooling, or special talents to manage. Truly, "off-grid" is only REALLY off-grid when it can be accomplished off-grid as well, as opposed to needing 'the grid' (i.e. Western-based companies and suppliers) to get them.

Community and social acceptance by the people where you choose to set up a new life in mind, the above are things feasible for poor simple people to implement, giving one the ability to connect and establish worthwhile mutually interesting relations.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/28/2014, 7:01 am


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
12/1/2011, 11:55 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
priorities


There are many aspects of farming that may confound the suburbanite city slicker who starts looking into it. That happened to me, anyway!
One hears about
- soil and composting [mulching, compost tea, etc. etc.]
- water engineering [dripping, permaculture, wetpots, hydroponics, etc.]
- interesting crops, trees, etc.
- heirloom seeds
and other things. It can get hard to get a handle on it all, to assimilate it all so it makes sense.
This simply takes time. It takes research. However, it's not rocket science.
In my own experience by being on La Gomera for 5 months with the intention of applying my TEOTWAWKI knowledge and ideas, i learned a few things about my own presumptions and about what's most important in practice. Sharing my experience may help others avoid making similar mistakes.
It doesn't make it easier that the people, books, or online sources of information usually have some specialty or sacred cow/hobby horse interest. Some people are all about how to compost, others are all about good seeds. It's all important! But first things first.

1: WATER
This is a two-edged sword: lots of water makes a bad survival location (because it's too attractive to others) but an unreliable [not year-round, non-consistent] supply makes one vulnerable to climatic variances and changes.
The most interesting survival locales around the world are where water ISN'T abundant. If water is (already) abundant somewhere, then 99% chance it's already occupied by farmers. Such areas will also be targets in an EOTWAWKI scenario. They'll be the first places starving masses head to, probably going from one farm to the next like so many locusts.
Areas where water is present but not interesting enough for mainstream farmers are prime survival opportunities. It's likely land that's not owned by anybody. If you claim it, no one will complain.
In a way, therefore, LACK OF WATER is one of the biggest priorities when it comes to preparing (or even for acquiring your own homestead in general).
Knowledge about permaculture, wetpots, mineralisation of soil, and hydraulic rampumps alone should be enough for anyone to be able to make fertile what mainstream farmers deem worthless property.

Besides all of this, water IS also what determines more than anything else where it's possible to thrive. With enough water, the poorest soils can be turned around in time, but without water the richest soil will avail you not at all. First consideration should be water. The first efforts in bringing land into cultivation should concern irrigation; later, a permaculturally established environment can suffice with rainwater. Water. Water. Water. First things first: location, location, location. Find a place where there's water.

2: SOIL
Plants won't thrive in poor soil. If they live at all, they still need proper nutrients in the soil to bear good quality fruit. Just surviving is not enough. If your plant doesn't THRIVE, it will bear less fruit, less large fruit, and less valuable fruit.
Bringing up the quality of soil generally takes time. It can take years. Micro organisms in the soil need to prosper. Composting, mulching, seawater agriculture, leyfarming,, all may be considered. There are tricks like planting a fish under every corn seed. Basic composting rules should be understood.
Good soil contains plenty of minerals, worms, and all kinds of subterranean life, fungi, microbes, and more. PH, salinity, and other things may be necessary to consider. No need to worry about these things. Usually they'll fall in line naturally. They should all be understood, however, if one is to assure oneself of success.

3: SEEDLINGS
If some good soil can be hauled in and enough water supplied by hand (until irrigation is completed), seeds should be planted. This is something you don't want to put off. The months until the seeds get to harvest can be long ones.
Seedlings need warmth, shade, perhaps cooling, and consistent conditions. Seeds take time and it's a mistake to put planting off. Of course if the season is wrong, that can't be avoided, though spring conditions can be created inside. Consider wind and it's drying or cooling effects. This applies to grown plants as well, but more so for seedlings.

4: Destructive fauna. Don't be misdirected by the placing at number 4; this can easily be more important than water. Whatever location you find where there's water, should be possible to keep free of (other people's) goats and sheep. Especially the places where other people don't farm they have goats roaming around. Natural obstacles are best, which are ideally built upon by planting obstructive vegetation and/or walls. Hacking away at footholds can also destroy access for goats. In the end only a rat or a monkey should be able to get to your plants.

5: Other people. There will be a tendency for other people to parasite off of your success. You will need to be in complete control. Knowledge of what it means to achieve success, however, gives control, i.e. the very knowledge that leads to success where others fail is the key to control.
Setting up a location also needs to be about being able to stop what brings success. If goats are offered one single way into your location, they will quickly eat away anything worth stealing. More slowly but more destructive is to be able to shut off what water you bring to your location.
If then, at any point, some person or group of people claim the fruits of your labor, you keep 99% of the groundwork you laid to keep for a later return. Soil, trees, subterranean life,, these will largely survive until you're ready to return (from other locations you're working on).


There's much more to be said, of course. Like, some idiot on La Gomera who lived there for 20 years said that the trickle of water next to my house/garden would dry up in a few weeks; IT NEVER DID! I trusted this jerk because he sounded reasonable and had lived next to that stream for 20 years. Thing is, even after 3 months of terrible heat and no rain, this stream was still a trickle that would've been enough to water my entire garden. The thing is that water that flows day-and-night, day-after-day ends up being more than enough. One can live off of 1/5 of an acre, supposedly, and if you're thrifty with your water it doesn't take much to garden 1/5 of an acre. Especially if principles like hydroponics or wetpots are applied, you really don't need too much water. All you need is a consistent source, but not a massive one.

I rerouted a stream in the valley next to where the house (and garden) were, flooding a terrace that'd been dry for decades. In a matter of days the most beautiful full green lawn popped up! It didn't even have much weeds. With grass, one can apply ley farming techniques and acquire good soil (the way most farmers got good soil in previous centuries). Soil, therefore, is an extension of water engineering and it's good to understand that you master your water supply first of all.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/28/2014, 6:27 am


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
1/16/2012, 7:58 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
wildlife and other undesirable animals (for your plants)


Another big problem i encountered while trying to apply what i'd learned is that other people's animals and wildlife are very interested in what you allow to grow. Especially in an area where hydro engineering is a must, i.e. an arid area through which a water source flows, all manner of rabbits, goats, and rats pop up.

A herd of 20 large goats came by the makeshift dam i'd built and destroyed it by their shere weight. They didn't come by there daily but when they did, they ate everything and trampled the rest.

This suggests that WHATEVER you do, you're going to need someone taking care of your plot 24/7, i.e. fulltime policing by either man, dog, or other option.
This isn't even about the threat by others and i'd not given it thought until i noticed that all my (heirloom seed) sprouts got eaten up as quickly as they came up.


In my own case in that valley, it would have been possible for me to keep the goats out if i'd built some walls to create a kind of fortress consisting mostly of the steep valley walls. Never underestimate a goat's ability to climb, though! As an urbanite, i had no idea! I've seen these hefty animals jump up 3 meter vertical obstacles. I was SURE i had one animal cornered, forcing it away, when it just darted up this wall of vertical rock that looked like it offered no way out. I was so wrong. ANY KIND OF LEDGE that you probably feel is too tiny to offer support, especially to a large animal, is enough for these bastards.
emoticon
It's a mistake to underestimate them.
Especially in arid climates that are opportune for survival, goats and sheep are everywhere. Keeping them out is a big deal. Rats may be annoying but goats will really do a lot of damage and in no time flat.

I also once saw a wild rabbit jump up a 2 meter vertical rock face because my car spooked it. I didn't know rabbits can go ballistic! emoticon It's good to know.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 1/17/2012, 11:39 am


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
1/17/2012, 10:47 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
5 people to an acre


This is (from) the Backyard Food Production newsletter, Jan 24:

So how much land does it take to be completely food self-reliant?
  
For those of you living in an apartment or with a suburban backyard - don't let the lack of land stop you from learning to grow food! Start with what you have, even if that is only a few square feet by a sunny window. Being able to grow healthy food is a necessary skill and a depression proof occupation. So much in our world is changing rapidly, and who knows where you will be in the future? Having some realistic expectations on how much land it takes is good information to have. And for those of you considering buying some land, here will give you some idea of what you'll need for the food production part.
  
How much land does it take?
  
When thinking of becoming self-reliant, the question arises "how much land do I need to be able to sustainably grow enough food for my family?" The exact answer to that question depends on several factors, but you can learn a lot, and make a pretty good estimate, by looking at some scenarios that span the various alternatives.
  
Lets start first off with the almost magical dream of the pure hunter/gatherer. I often hear this one from those concerned about a collapse of civilization. The !@#$ hits the fan and you take your rifle and a few supplies and head out to the wilderness to live off the land. Just how much land does it take to support you without destroying all the wildlife and plant populations? How much area do you need in order live sustainably as a hunter/gatherer?
  
Since there are so few actual hunter/gathers left alive on the planet, and the few places where they do still exist tend to be jungles which look nothing like anything in North America, we will turn to anthropological data. The quick and easy answer is that traditional peoples used on average, about 10 square miles per person. 10 square miles is 6,400 acres - that is for one person. There are numerous studies and authors that cite this number and one of the most accessible is Jared Diamond, author of the popular title Collapse: How Societies Choose To Fail or Succeed. Another excellent source is Tending The Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources which is a wonderful book detailing how sustainable wild-crafting is more about taking care of the land than simply taking stuff (both books are available at Amazon here). California's lush and diverse landscapes were able to support some of the highest native population densities known in North America with the highest being almost 1.5 people per square mile living on the coast of the Santa Barbara channel. The plant and animal communities in the Santa Barbara area have been largely destroyed by modern peoples and that density is no longer possible today of course. As another comparison, desert regions of California had roughly 1 person per 12.5 square miles.
  
Before we head off into other more obtainable land use scenarios, lets pause for a moment to acknowledge that in addition to having access to a huge tract of land for living the hunter/gatherer lifestyle, you also need at least a decade to learn the many, many, skills of living such as tracking and hunting, trapping, botany, weather cycles, fiber and cordage, shelter, tool making, fire starting, tanning, and so much more.
  
OK, so you won't be going that primitive. What about you growing your own food in gardens, food plots, orchards, livestock, and perhaps a bit of hunting? Agriculture has gotten us the these high population levels so far anyway, hasn't it? Yes it has, and small scale agriculture is definitely the way to go for most people. So how much land are you going to need for that?
  
The research to the answer to that question was started back in the 70's by a very forward thinking man named John Jeavons. The work has continued since then and a method developed into a system called "Bio-Intensive Gardening". The Bio-Intensive method has been implemented worldwide to alleviate hunger and malnutrition. There is a wealth of detail in the entire Bio-intensive method, but the short answer to how much land you need can be summarized as approximately 8,000 [sign in to see URL]. for a complete diet for one person (you need 4,000 sq/ft. of actual growing space and at least 4,000 [sign in to see URL]. for pathways and access). That is also assuming you have four growing seasons per year. So if you can only get two growing seasons, then you need to double the space needed per person. For reference, an acre is 43,560 [sign in to see URL]. So in a more southern climate, you could theoretically support about 5 people per acre.
  
The absolute best reference for the Bio-Intensive method is the book How To Grow More Vegetables Than You Ever Thought Possible On Less Land Than You Can Imagined by John Jeavons (available through our Amazon store, here). And for another comparison, with data taken from Jeavons book, the average U.S. diet with conventional farming requires 15,000 to 30,000 [sign in to see URL]. and is done in such a way that it diminishes soil - i.e. it is not sustainable.
  
So small scale agriculture is definitely going to be your best bet. My personal experience is that 2 acres in a mild temperate region will completely wear you out and is enough room to comfortably support a family of four with a variety of food sources such as gardens, orchards, small livestock, and wild crafting. You can still do a lot in less area, and of course, everyone always wants more. Some caveats I've got to throw in there is you definitely need about a decade of experience to homestead like this, and you also need enough water. An excellent source for seeing a what a diverse sustainable homestead on small acreage looks like is the video tutorial package titled Food Production Systems for a Backyard or Small Farm. The video we have created shows in good detail the systems we've setup to generate a lot of calories per year, how we did it, and why. It is a good example by folks who are actually living it.
 
But don't forget, even if you live in an apartment, there is a lot you can do. The most important thing is to get started. Did you get a few plants from a nursery, or check out a gardening club yet?
 
Jacque and Jim Gates are the owners of Bastrop Producers Market, Inc, a market for local, organic, and sustainable farmers. Here is what they say about the DVD: "Food Production Systems for a Backyard or Small Farm" has all the information you need to become self-reliant and sustainable. It comes with basic "how to" DVD with demonstrations on a wide variety of subjects and a bonus resource DVD. A real bargain really well done!"

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 2/14/2012, 8:25 pm


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
2/14/2012, 8:25 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
independence on 400m2 (1/5 of an acre)


Revolution (Award winning short-film 2009)- The Urban Homestead

This man in Los Angeles/Pasadena grows 80% of his own food, has his own animals, keeps bees, makes his own fuel, hardly uses any city water or electricity, and actually sells produce to a restaurant, all on the land around his normal city plot.

This is a very inspirational movie about this family who even succeeds with the limits of living in a large metropolitan city.

My favorite second of the movie is when it shows the clay pot being buried as part of their ]wetpot irrigation.

---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
2/14/2012, 8:26 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
introduction


Bill Mollison's permaculture comes from his idea of permanent agriculture, i.e. sustainable: locally, indefinately, and globally.
I used to have his ultimate permaculture 'bible'. Cost me 150 Australian dollars. A sound investment, i figured, as we'll all have to be intelligent agriculturalists and, let's face it, copying modern farmers ain't gonna cut it! Bill Mollison is one of those rare individuals who went out and made his own way, based on intelligence and character, and paved the way for all us other souls who hadn't gotten around to farming yet.

Permaculture is all about making the most use of what one has at hand,, be it location, climate, animals, whatever. He's a pragmatist and not a vegetarian or something, though he seems proud of the fact that he hasn't found a need to cut down a tree since he stopped his work as lumberjack many decades ago. If you Google or YouTube "Bill Mollison" you're bound to run into very interesting stories and testamonies.

All in all, it seems more or less unavoidable to get into permaculture if you're going to get into agriculture at all and don't want to be reinventing the wheel at every turn. Mollison has accomplished some pretty mean feats when it comes to greening desert and such and when you've seen a few videos of people implementing permaculture, you'll understand that a lot more is possible than you imagined before, including growing lemons and cherries at 1500 meter altitude (47 degrees longitude mainland Europe).
]Some nice documentaries on permaculture. Enjoy!

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 3/12/2013, 11:21 am


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
2/14/2012, 8:37 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
plant needs


Plants need water. If we understand more, we realize they need continual water underground for their roots, i.e. we need to allow subterranean microbes to survive and thrive.
Plants also not only need sunlight but often they need direct sunlight. Often, like with tomato plants, THEY NEED DIRECT SUNLIGHT WHEN IT'S HOT OUTSIDE. I hadn't considered it but it was expressed by some very successful lady growing tomatoes in Nevada: the heat and sunlight on the leaves of a plant allow water to evaporate which the plant needs to cool down and pull up minerals with. It's no different from how sweating allows us to keep cool in heat.

---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
3/12/2013, 9:15 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
animal species


People [city slickers] who think self-reliance think they need eggs and meat and buy chickens and a pig. These, however, are typical animals that belong on large farms. They are poor choices for a single family.

A good start for a small family would be:
- muscovy ducks
- rabbits
- sheep

Under ]ANIMALS you'll find more arguments and facts concerning such choices, i.e. why a sheep rather than a goat for instance.
The scobies do what a pig will without the immense demands a pig makes. Bovines, similarly, demand large plots of land, knowledge, and preparations to make them a viable option. In the end bad choices may be the difference between failure and success or at least between surviving and thriving.

---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
3/12/2013, 9:21 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
agricultural misconceptions


Both city-slickers and farmers alike have ideas about farming which are WRONG. 99.9% of farmers apply tactics that are inefficient and cause them to waste opportunities and work much harder than necessary.
City-slickers, on the other hand, assume [sic] that farming is hard work and that it's therefore not worth the hassle of chosing to do it, even if it means better life quality.

99.9% of British farmers feed their cows hay in winter. During the summer they collect hay (to give later). farm, however, applies a cheap simple technique [foggage farming] that allows it's cows to remain on the land in all seasons. They don't need to harvest hay, they don't need to feed it in winter, and they don't require the machinery [tractors] or time to do these things. (The quality of their produce obviously also increases.) OTHER farmers suffer, getting into debt, and barely get by though they work their butts off.
Which would you rather be? One of the ignorant masses or someone who understands some agricultural basics that allow the farm life to become successful and enjoyable...?

So people stay in the cities with their polluted air, water, and foods. The quality of life is poor but they fear to become farmers because they don't know about farming and they've no money to go out and buy land with.
HOWEVER, you don't need to emulate the farmers out there to begin with! You also don't need to buy land because the farmers out there applying inefficient destructive techniques consider much land worthless that isn't!
If you ]consider the documentaries on good farming practices, you'll see that freedom is as fast, simple, and easy as acquiring some basic agricultural principles that mainstream people, including farmers, don't know about or apply.
This is the age of internet. Farmers and city-slickers alike who are caught up in everyday survival don't get around to learning about farming techniques that come from (research) around the world. Freedom is knowledge... applied.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/28/2014, 7:03 am


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
6/20/2013, 10:03 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
TheLivingShadow Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: Morocco
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
TRACE MINERALS; why rockdust just isn't good enough


Foggage farming is about having a grass guild. The importance and potential thereof, however, cannot be overstressed, for increased and improved soil generally comes from 2 sources: grasslands and forest. So if you have a 'shortcut' to creating a grassland guild, that is huge.

Some folks have been growing soil with no-till farming but that is quite labor intensive and requires quite a lot of know-how and experience. Also, it is essentially and ultimately about CONCERVATION and RECYCLING of minerals. As such it is ultimately about RETARDING implosion of processes that are UNsustainable.
The beauty of foggage farming combined with seawater fertilization is that it actually INCREASES minerals in the soil and anyone can do it. All you do is sow a decent seed mix. The animals do the rest. The only other knowledge necessary concerns basic herding practices [thinking Allan Savory et al].

Before the age of petrochemical fertilizing practices, ley farming was the go-to way for farmers to create soil. Since ]foggage farming is really just improved ley farming, it is therefore essential knowledge if the world is ever to transcend the use of petrochemical fertilization practices on any meaningful scale. Composting will not cut it. Conservation won't cut it. We need a good way to create soil that is rich in minerals.

Therefore i would upgrade foggage farming with seawater fertilization. That's because it's all about minerals. It's always been about minerals; minerals and microbes. In this sense soil and health/the human body are the same. People get lost in details [can't see the forest through the trees] but in the end a person with enough minerals and (species of) gut flora is healthy. It is when minerals or gut flora are lacking that diseases can take root. Soil is also about minerals and these come from the rocks that roots and microbes break down. Trees, i.e. forests, are essential here because they root deep, but not all locations can sustain trees and there we have grasslands.
Conventional agriculture is about being a PARASITE on these minerals, using them up bit by bit. It took 100 years to use up the soil in the American mid-west but conventional agriculture managed it in the end. The point, however, is that many so-called ecological practices/sites/farms are only focusing on recycling these minerals and conserving them; that can slow the process down, but in the end the only sustainable option is one that actually grows soil AND mineral content.

There have been locales that sourced their minerals from seawater. In fact, just about all of the great cultures in known history originated at river deltas; Rome, Egypt, etc. The great mineral density of their soils allowed for not just health, but mental health. This was probably largely due to the sufficient levels of magnesium and iodine stemming from seawater, either from slightly brine water [river water fed by 1% seawater] or periodical floods. It is documented that increased iodine in the diet leads to increased IQ. A healthy brain organ means a well-functioning mind, after all. Good minds lead to more sophisticated culture. In the end it's all about minerals.

So do grasslands grow soil? I guess they do when they are natural, i.e. they are where no trees can grow and the grasses root down to bedrock and slowly break it down. Otherwise the grass is really just recycling the minerals in the soil (since grasses absorb all minerals available). That's great but in the long run it's not adding to mineral content. So that is why i would do the following steps, all of them:
- proper herding techniques
- ley farming, i.e. herding on lawns for years at a stretch in order to create soil
- foggage farming, i.e. grass guilds
- add seawater solutions to the grass to increase mineral content

That would mean that it is easy to grow soil anywhere without waiting for a forest to grow. All it takes is some knowledge, some animals, some grass, and seawater. The quality of life that can be arranged in this way is feasible on any scale, affordable, cutting edge, sustainable, and easy.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 8/13/2015, 3:03 pm


---
READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
8/13/2015, 2:37 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 


Add a reply

Page:  1  2 





You are not logged in (login)
Back To Top