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TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

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domes


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Building a shelter/house is one of the MAJOR aspects of survival. I don't see people taking it seriously, because you have to assume you might either be on the run [from people or nature] or have to be mobile for any number of reasons and you can't take your house with you. So you need to have an idea of how to set up camp quickly.
Now you also have to take into account that it could be quite cold, or for that matter, also dangerous, quite hot. A tent will then not suffice. Digging a hole, if possible at all, takes time. What will you do? Let's reiterate: you need to have a method of housing that'll keep you...

- mobile
- fast
- warm/cool

These are not exaggerated things to consider. If you're talking survival at all, you will need to think about a housing method that takes the above into account. If you survive because you have knowledge, location, and perhaps supplies enough to eat,, but your house is destroyed or far away, you will probably still die without proper shelter! So you made an amazing shelter, but the location turns out to be wrong, or you're driven from it, or were away from it and couldn't get to it; you have no place to stay, no shelter; now what? All you have left is knowhow.

That is why i fell in love with the idea of strawbale housing years ago. Nothing i've ever heard of compares. Like any system, you need building materials, straw or hay or dead organic matter to tie into bundles, but you DON'T need tools like saws or hammers or even nails. You don't need logs or bricks or the tools to deal with them. You also don't need the warmth of the sun to dry your concrete or adobe or mud.
You can build a strawbale with your bare hands, but with your strawbale you'll have a building block with which to be able to construct housing that is warm, cool,, quick, cheap, and simple to build, durable, and ultimately fire-resistant if covered with lime. NOTHING, no other building scheme offers all of that, yet demands so little.
You can build a strawbale home when you're on the run, when you're settling in for the winter, or if you plan to build for decades.

You may think: "Yeah, but what about..." Forget it! There are no drawbacks. If covered with lime, it is more fire-resistant than any other building you can think of, short of a meter of concrete [but then you're not talking about survival]. When you cover it with [url=[sign in to see URL] or [url=[sign in to see URL] which are natural methods one can use almost everywhere, any drawbacks the straw may have had disappear. But in a survival setting where you don't have time to lime or cob, you'll suffer the smell, rodents, itch, and fire hazard, yes. But then what other housing would have saved you from such? But at least you'll survive the elements and that's more than an option like a tent offers when harsh weather comes by.


Years ago i was charmed by monolithic domes, but then ran into strawbale building. I considered that the two needed to be combined, but there were no photos and only one story of such a building to be found on the internet at the time. But i KNEW i was right. Building straw into a dome is the only way to go. Regular strawbale builders won't help you because they demand you make a wooden roof, which is stupid because you build the walls in an hour, at no cost, and then your roof comes to many times the effort and resources the rest of the house ever did.

At a strawbale workshop i was at,, no shade, 30 degrees,, i got the group together and had a strawbale igloo built in 20 MINUTES! Everyone loved it! Instant shade and comfort.

in or sign up to see linked image content--I had to think of how to build a strawbale dome in my head all by myself. And the only plans on the internet involve ]geodesic domes as a framework, but that means more tools, more materials, more knowhow, and more time. Which is great if you have them. But they are NOT NECESSARY.

The dome is unique in that it can be built WITHOUT A FRAME. You start with a circle and work you way up by ever-smaller circles until it closes. You don't need a frame of any kind and i'm going to explain what i've come up with to not only allow the safest kind of structure one can imagine, but one that will allow it to be quite large, as well, which can be very desirable when dealing with larger groups and their needs for air [high ceiling].

You can build a small strawbale dome easily, just by going round and round in circles until you reach the top.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/27/2013, 10:18 am
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Strawbale building II


Now, you'll run into a few variables and possible problems even with that. The bigger the strawbale, the bigger the circle has to be to make the cracks in between your 'building blocks' acceptable. Your strawbales are just humungous bricks, after all, but you don't want to make things harder on yourself than necessary. The bigger the brick, the harder it is to build. A dome, that is. If a straight wall, then no, but straight walls fall down...
So if you have a strawbale machine or can talk to the farmer before he starts baling, set the machine to the smallest settings. If you make your bales without a machine you have every freedom and just remember: smaller is better. The bigger your dome, the bigger your bales can be, of course.

Domes are STRONG. They are safe, either as shelter or as home. Imagine having a strawbale dome roof and having something come down from the sky; a dome will absorb like nothing else can and quite possibly reflect whatever comes your way, perhaps thrown there by the force of a megastorm or tornado. Concrete geodesic domes have withstood blows that would've demolished any similar regular construct. A telephone pole that fell during a storm and crashed into a dome house, something that would destroy any normal wall, caused no damage. The dome shape is unique in its ability to not only withstand the elements but also to not attract in the first place, like certain shapes invite the wind to collect and carry it away.

Strawbale and dome buildings are also safe from FIRE. When a fire once ravaged an area, nothing was left standing except for a strawbale wall. Once covered in a layer of lime or cob, heat only chars a few centimeter of the hay, the outer layer, but after the oxygen is gone within the strawbale wall, the rest of the hay remains untouched and insulates while remaining as support, i.e. you're strawbale wall just becomes a few percent thinner, that's all. A test with a 1000 degree fire on one side of a strawbale wall, had the temperature on the other side go up by a mere 6 degrees.
The dome structure, too, is amazing. A fire that passed over a dome house, left it almost completely untouched, as the fire, like wind, can't get a good hold on the rounded form.

A strawbale dome also means that IF it were to fall down, you'd be having strawbales falling down on you... Not concrete, not beams of wood, etc. Just strawbales. And you can cut your way out from under them, too, even if you have to use your teeth. Try that with a slab of concrete on top of you!
A strawbale dome structure is also flexible enough to keep standing in case of a major earthquake. It is not rigid. Though you can drive a car over a strawbale dome, it is nothing like one big solid brick or concrete wall. Its strength is more complex, but no less sturdy for all of that.

Ergo, a strawbale dome is SAFE. It can offer you safety quickly, simply, and without needing tools [though they might help], and it offers the kind of safety that will allow you to ride out a blizzard,, but all you're basically working with is straw or hay or whatever organic matter you can bind together. And in a pinch you don't even need rope because you can make rope out of straw. Of course that makes the whole process take longer. But sometimes beggars can't be chosers and you might be happy to know what i'm about to tell you when you've had to run for your life and leave your saw behind.

Strawbales have been around some hundred years. In fact, the oldest strawbale building is about 100 years old. When they invented the strawbale machine, farmers' lives were made a bit easier. But the idea of making a brick out of organic matter and using that AS A BRICK has nothing to do with strawbale machines. It's just a principle to apply. You can make a 'strawbale machine' by making a frame to put straw/hay/etc. in, pressing it together, and tying a rope around it. Hell, you could even dig a hole in the ground, put some ropes in the right place, fill the hole with straw, get some people standing on it or something, and tie the straw together and PRESTO! you have a strawbale. Making or having strawbales is not the issue. We're talking survival and we're talking feasibility; tying together organic material is almost ALWAYS possible. Pouring concrete or sawing wood is not.

Strawbales are tied together so they in fact become like a straw WALL. Just like cement brings bricks together so you have a whole wall at the end, rope brings the strawbales together just like it did the straw in the first place to make the bale.
When you make your circle of strawbales, you bind every bale you add to the strawbales already in place. You drive some sticks through them, as well. As you go higher the circles close into a dome, but they don't fall down because the dome shape keeps them from falling down AND because you've tied them in place, which particularly applies to the last ones.
The best way to build a strawbale dome, a way that makes it possible to make it quite large and sturdy, is by using the smallest size strawbales you can find/make. Use as small strawbales as possible and you make the next technique possible: 2 or 3 layers of strawbales. The danger of domes falling down, which is dependent on how tight they are packed together and on how big the dome is in relation to the bales, is greatly reduced by just making 2 or 3 layers of strawbales at the same time, while working yourself upwards. That's why you also want strawbales that are as small as possible, because the wall then becomes 2 or 3 times as thick as one bale.
As the circles of bales go up, the outside circles become lower than the inside circle, because the outside dome is bigger than the inside one. That means that the cracks between the strawbales, potential weak points in case of massive pressure, get to be next to the body of other bales. With this techniquie i think i've come up with a way to make it possible to make even bigger, or in case you use tiny bales, even stronger domes.
Windows are just wooden frames you place somewhere and build around.
Openings i'd personally make circular, why make a weak (cornered) point in the structure?

So there you have it. What you need to know in order to make a strong but flexible, warm and cool,, but quick, easy, and simple to build shelter or home.
They have built strawbale homes in Arizona that don't even use air-conditioning, they're that cool. Inside walls can be built of stone that hold onto warmth.
People around the world DON'T use this technique because they just don't KNOW about it. It's the idea of making bricks out of dead grass that's just too paradoxal to come up with, i guess. But these are no play houses. And most people aren't on the run and have years to build their homes, so don't bother with strawbales, even though they'd be better off doing so.
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In fact, if you were planning to build a home today, i'd still advise you make it a strawbale home and preferably a dome. Domes make the most economic use of inside space, saving heating, cooling, and building costs. It's also a good way to just build your roof, if you've built a cilinder-shaped space to begin with. A house, even a strong dome-shaped concrete one, is no substitute for a bunker or cave, but as houses go, concrete and/or strawbale domes are a consideration that makes other options pale in comparison as far as efficiency, safety, and ease are concerned.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 2/18/2012, 1:35 pm
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Strawbale building III


]plans for a mobile pinestraw baling machine

Strawbale walls covered with lime are THE most fire resistant form of construct there is.
I did cover this above shortly but let me elaborate:
the strawbales are compressed so they don't have too much O2 in them to begin with. Then they're covered with lime or cob and the oxygen is cut off completely and even if there's a hole in the outer layer, the straw is compressed too greatly to allow the air in.
Normally the fire turns the outer few centimeters, just a few, to charcoal, but then all oxygen within the wall/bales is gone and the charcoaled layer actually works as insulation against further burning, like when you burn brush to stop a forest fire. So after the strawbale has been charred for a few centimeters, it'll stop burning, but, unlike other walls that are only a few centimeters to begin with, most of the wall is left standing and still supports the structure.
In this case the dome shape i suggest only adds to this advantage of strawbale building.
You can look this stuff up at any strawbale building site and a lot of research has been done, of course, if only because it's the most obvious question on everyone's mind. One site has this to say:

Once the straw bales have been stacked up to make the walls they are then compressed and rendered to finish off the wall. After this has been done there is very little oxygen left in the straw bales which gives a finished straw bale wall the ability to withstand bush fires astonishingly well.

The CSIRO performed some tests in 2002 with rendered straw bale walls where ]all involved where surprised and impressed by the excellent performance the straw bales displayed during the fire tests. Also in tests performed in America the fire resistance of rendered straw bales was found to be 2 hours compared to a timber framed and cladded building only achieving a fire rating of 8 minutes. This shows that straw bale walls are quite safe even in bush fire areas. See Strawtec FAQ (Fire) and Australasian Straw Bale Building Association FAQ


THATCHING
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alone can make a house!
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Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 1/2/2014, 11:33 pm
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online


]Nice 10 minute vid on straw bale building
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]Desert [sign in to see URL]
(including dome calculator)

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/7/2014, 7:57 pm


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READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
3/14/2012, 11:35 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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parabolic domes


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tolek / Musgum house
As a very good and extensive architecture series i followed on YouTube made clear [no longer online], the ideal structure isn't a spherical dome but rather one based on a parabola.

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READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
2/5/2013, 12:36 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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concrete domes


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Instant inflatable concrete dome
If you've money for such a thing, these are instant concrete domes that only require inflation and water [rain will do] to set up a concrete dome structure.

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6/27/2013, 10:35 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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prefab domes


Remote In Montana They Carted It By River Raft And By Mule To Build
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