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TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

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honey (and other hive products)


from Stephen Buhner's book Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers, page 56:

The long-lived of antiquity who ate a diet primarily composed of bee products is impressive: Pythagoras, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, lived to the age of 90. His disciple, Apollonius, lived to 113. Anacreon, another Greek of antiquity, lived to 115. The Greek Democritus, perhaps one of the world's greatest physicists, lived to 109.
Pliny the Elder researched the ages of people living exclusively on honey and hive product diets late in the first century A.D. He found that in the region of the Apennine mountains, there were an anolomous number of people more than 100 years of age. Fifty-four were 100, fifty-seven were between 100 and 110, two were 125 years old, and seven were 135 years of age or older. In Parma, he located five who were more than 125, and nearby another eleven more than 100.
Piast, the king of Poland in A.D. 825, was a beekeeper who subsisted primarily on honey and other hive products. He lived to be 120 years of age. One Hebrew tribe, the Essenes, were noted beekeepers and renowned for their great age -- many passing 100 years.
Plutarch (A.D. 46-120) observed that the Britons, who subsisted on great amounts of honey, "only begin to grow old at one hundred and twenty years of age". The original Bardic name of the British Isles was "the Honey Isle of Beli" -- beekeeping was a major industry and honey one of its principle commodities. When Pliny the Elder visted the British Isles, he commented that "These islanders consume great quantities of honey brew." A pre-WW II investigation of tombstones in Britain noted that there were many long-lived Britishers who ate a great deal of honey from the comb. A few:
Sir Owen of Scotland died at 124 years of age,
his last son was born when he was 98 and he walked 74 miles in six days in the last year of his life;
Peter Garden, a Scot, died at the age of 131, keeping the appearance of a young man until the very end;
Willaim Ellis -- 130;
Mr. Eccleston, Irish -- 143;
Colonel Thomas Winsloe, Irish -- 146;
Francis Consist -- 150;
John Mount, Scot -- 136;
Thomas Parr -- 152.
And throughout the world beekeepers and mead drinkers have been reputed to enjoy extremely long life and good health. Sir Kenelm Digby remarked on this when he commented about one of his mead recipes:
The Meath is singularly good for a consumption, stone, gravel, weak-sight, and many more things. A chief Burgomaster of Antwerpe, used for many years to drink no other drink but this; at Meals and at all times, even for the pledging of healths. And though he were an old man, he was of an extraordinary vigor every way, and had every year a Child, had always a great appetite, and good digestions; and yet was not fat.

Perhaps the most interesting example of remarkable health from modern day is that of Noel Johnson, who at the age of 70 and in poor health began eating a diet consisting largely of honey and hive products. At the age of 90 (1993) he was title holder of the World's Senior Boxing Championship and a seasoned marathoner competing in events on every continent on Earth. He looks to be about 55 years of age.


It should be understood that ancient meads were often made including other hive products like propolis and royal jelly, as entire sections of a hive [or an entire hive] might be thrown in the mix. Also, though even Stephen Buhner's recipes usually mention boiling the ingredients for an hour or more, often hive products are added to hot and cooling water and don't get boiled themselves. Raw recipes, too, should be considered for health purposes. Buhner's book is thick and bursting with all kinds of background and historical data and thoroughly worth having and reading. It is in my opinion a must-have and must-read!

Also see ]my post on alcohol
and post under ,offset=0#post1597]1stAID / DISEASE, alternatives to maintream medicinal madness


Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 11/25/2016, 7:40 am


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READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
2/21/2012, 10:53 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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articles etc.


]The benefits of raw honey
Raw honey has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal properties. It promotes body and digestive health, is a powerful antioxidant, strengthens the immune system, eliminates allergies, and is an excellent remedy for skin wounds and all types of infections. Raw honey's benefits don't stop there. Raw honey can also stabilize blood pressure, balance sugar levels, relieve pain, calm nerves, and it has been used to treat ulcers. Raw honey is also an expectorant and anti-inflammatory and has been known to effectively treat respiratory conditions such as bronchitis and asthma.
follow the link to read the rest

Documentary: Honey Hunters - Hunting mad honey.
Hallucinogenic honey in Nepal.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 3/28/2014, 11:05 am


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READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
4/8/2012, 9:46 am Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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Manuka


]How to properly use manuka honey (and where to find it)
Though it has not nearly received the level of attention it truly deserves, manuka honey high in "unique manuka factor" (UMF) is a therapeutic healing food that can be used in a variety of applications both internally and externally. And it is this UMF, which can run as high as 20 percent total content in some higher quality varieties, that makes manuka honey uniquely medicinal.
According to Dr. Ralf Schlothauer, Ph.D., CEO of Comvita, New Zealand's largest supplier of medical manuka honey, UMF is a concentration of unique antioxidant phenols present in manuka honey that directly inhibits bacterial growth and promotes healing. And unlike synthetic antibiotics, UMF does not promote the growth and spread of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, which makes it highly effective at treating wounds, burns, and other skin problems that would otherwise be prone to serious infection.
follow link to read the rest
5/26/2012, 8:15 am Link to this post Send Email to TheDoctorIsInTheHouse   Send PM to TheDoctorIsInTheHouse Blog
 
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meads


Acan— A Native Mexican version of mead.
Acerglyn — A mead made with honey and maple syrup.
Bochet — A mead where the honey is caramelized or burned separately before adding the water. Gives toffee, chocolate, marshmallow flavors.
Braggot — Braggot (also called bracket or brackett). Originally brewed with honey and hops, later with honey and malt — with or without hops added. Welsh origin (bragawd).
Black mead — A name sometimes given to the blend of honey and blackcurrants.
Capsicumel — A mead flavored with chile peppers.
Chouchenn — A kind of mead made in Brittany.
Cyser — A blend of honey and Apple juice fermented together; see also cider.
Czwórniak — A Polish mead, made using three units of water for each unit of honey
Dandaghare — A mead from Nepal, combines honey with Himalayan herbs and spices. It has been brewed since 1972 in the city of Pokhara.
Dwójniak — A Polish mead, made using equal amounts of water and honey
Great mead — Any mead that is intended to be aged several years. The designation is meant to distinguish this type of mead from "short mead" (see below).
Gverc or Medovina — Croatin mead prepared in Samobor and many other places. The word “gverc” or “gvirc” is from the German "Gewürze" and refers to various spices added to mead.
Hydromel — Hydromel literally means "water-honey" in Greek. It is also the French name for mead. (Compare with the Spanish hidromiel and aquamiel, Italian idromele and Portuquese hidromel). It is also used as a name for a very light or low-alcohol mead.
Medica — Slovenian, Croatian, variety of Mead.
Medovina— Czech, Serbian, Bulqarian, Bosnian and Slovak for mead. Commercially available in Czech Republic, Slovakia and presumably other Central and Eastern European countries.
Medovukha — Eastern Slavic variant (honey-based fermented drink)
Melomel — Melomel is made from honey and any fruit. Depending on the fruit-base used, certain melomels may also be known by more specific names (see cyser, pyment, morat for examples)
Metheglin — Metheglin starts with traditional mead but has herbs and/or spices added. Some of the most common metheglins are ginger, tea, orange peel, nutmeg,coriander, cinnamon, cloves or vanilla. Its name indicates that many metheglins were originally employed as folk medicines. The Welsh word for mead is medd, and the word "metheglin" derives from meddyglyn, a compound of meddyg, "healing" + llyn, "liquor."
Morat — Morat blends honey and Mulberries.
Mulsum— Mulsum is not a true mead, but is unfermented honey blended with a high-alcohol wine.
Omphacomel — A mediæval mead recipe that blends honey with ver-juice; could therefore be considered a variety of pyment (qv).
Oxymel — Another historical mead recipe, blending honey with wine vinegar.
Pitarrilla — Mayan drink made from a fermented mixture of wild honey, balche tree bark and fresh water.
Pyment — Pyment blends honey and red or white grapes. Pyment made with white grape juice is sometimes called "white mead."
PóBtorak — A Polish mead, made using two units of honey for each unit of water
Rhodomel — Rhodomel is made from honey,rode hips, petals or rose attar and water.
Sack mead — This refers to mead that is made with more copious amounts of honey than usual. The finished product retains an extremely high specific gravity and elevated levels of sweetness. It derives its name, according to one theory, from the fortified dessert wine Sherry (which is sometimes sweetened after fermentation and in England once bore the nickname of "sack"); another theory is that the term derived from the Japanese drink sake, being introduced by Spanish and Portuguese traders.
Short mead — Also called "quick mead." A type of mead recipe that is meant to age quickly, for immediate consumption. Because of the techniques used in its creation, short mead shares some qualities found in cider (or even light ale): primarily that it is effervescent, and often has a cidery taste. It can also be champagne-like.
Show mead — A term which has come to mean "plain" mead: that which has honey and water as a base, with no fruits, spices or extra flavorings. Since honey alone often does not provide enough nourishment for the yeast to carry on its life cycle, a mead that is devoid of fruit, etc. will sometimes require a special yeast nutrient and other enzymes to produce an acceptable finished product. In most competitions including all those using the BJCP style guidelines as well as the International Mead Fest, the term "traditional mead" is used for this variety. It should be considered, however, that since mead is historically a very variable product, such recent (and artificial) guidelines apply mainly to competition judging as a means of providing a common language; style guidelines, per se, do not really apply to commercial and historical examples of this or any type of mead.
Sima - a quickly fermented low-alcoholic Finnish variety, seasoned with lemon and associated with the festival of yappu.
Tej— Tej is an Ethiopian mead, fermented with wild yeasts (and bacteria), and with the addition of gesho. Recipes vary from family to family, with some recipes leaning towards braggot with the inclusion of grains.
Trójniak — A Polish mead, made using two units of water for each unit of honey.
White mead — A mead that is colored white, either from herbs or fruit used or sometimes egg whites
]source

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 9/9/2017, 8:55 pm


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READ THIS AND SAVE YOUR OWN LIFE
9/9/2017, 8:53 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 


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