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TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

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arid climate gardening


Gardening In The Heat with Marjory Wildcraft
What to grow in terrible heat?
- okra
- sweet potatoes
- black-eyed peas
Also:
nutsage
canalilly
bamboo

]Plants that indicate ground water

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 8/10/2015, 4:37 pm


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Groasis waterboxx


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Imagine buying € 2000 worth of these boxes, putting grape vines out somewhere no one's interested in having anyway, and harvesting grapes from there 3 years later...

This tool is especially valuable for making use of land no one else is interested in. Therefore, you don't need to buy or rent land, you just bring your boxes. Preferably somewhere people hardly come. Frankly, your main problem is either finding a place where goats don't come, or making it so they can't (so living there, with or without a dog, is one of the options.)
This is truly liberating technology, affordable to just about anyone.

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10/12/2012, 3:25 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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wet pot irrigation


]Home-made wet pots
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]original post and other links

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Though the above link suggests caulking the saucer upside-down to the plant pot, if one were to allow it to collect rainwater (when it does rain), that would mean rain would fill up the wet pots, either partially or perhaps even enough that filling them by hand or hose is unnecessary. One might also use (large) soup plates or any kind of plate that isn't flat. The saucer can be filled with rocks, also to prevent any hole from getting blocked.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 1/20/2013, 8:50 pm


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1/20/2013, 4:39 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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sources / vids / etc.


]Reversing Desertification by Paul Wheaton

Also see posts under ]Greening Arid Earth

Successful Vegetable Garden in Las Vegas Desert Yields 600 lbs of Tomatoes

]Burkina Faso: The Man Who Stopped the Desert
This is basically the story of a man who turned failing agriculture in arid climate around by digging holes and planting trees; the holes allow puddles to form when it rains, leaving pockets of vegetation that survive the dry months; the trees do wonders for the water level of the land and support other vegetation in various ways.
The farmer who started doing this (30 years ago) was ridiculed by his peers for planting trees.

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Judith Schwartz mentions the Burkina Faso story in a podcast on OneRadioNetwork. Hers is basically the ley farming message, even though she doesn't mention it. In the 50's and 60's a game reserve warden in (then) Rhodesia [Zimbabwe] noticed how plants benefit from being grazed as much as the grazers benefit from the plants.
This podcast, however, has helped me to understand how larger domestic animals may be of use. Though cows will still only be useful if one has many hectares of land, it's clear they may then provide an essential tool for long term agriculture.
Patrick Timpone [host] mentioned a man in Texas who had copped a lot of cedar trees, using them to terrace the land they had previously occupied, thereby creating an area for lush green vegetation.
]Terra Preta would then entail burning the trees down to coal and soaking them in urine before burrying them.

]Project Deep Roots pdf can be downloaded here. It discusses how the Hopi indians in Arizona were able to crow corn in the desert.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/1/2014, 8:07 am


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desert species


tomato: Hawaiian Tropic [[url=[sign in to see URL] & Juliet & Indigo Rose

TREES
pommegranate [fruit]
pauwlonia [wood]
white leadtree
silverberry [shade/fruit]
marula [fruit]

7 crops that thrive in desert climate
- basil
- okra
- nightshade plants
- (dinosaur) kale
- red malabar spinach
- swiss chards
- purple tree collard

Plants for Desert Gardening
3:30 Nanking cherry
3:50 sand cherry
4:35 wolfberry lyan (similar to gojiberry)
5:30 Italian stone pine
6:50 pomegranate
7:35 lace bark elm
10:10 four-wing saltbrush
11:40 shadescale saltbush
12:10 desert saltbrush
13:45 quail bush
15:00 California buckwheat
15:20 Indian rice grass
15:45 alkalai sacaton
16:20 desert almond
16:40 caragana (a legume)
17:10 screwbean mesquite
17:50 honey mesquite
18:10 chaste tree
19:35 green Indian tea (Mormon tea; ephedra)
20:00 quail bush
20:50 buffalo gourd (fruit poinsonous at maturity) 21:30 hedge rose

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 8/1/2015, 8:44 pm


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seawater agriculture


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Carl Hodge's ]Seawater Foundation grow shrimp, fish, mangrove, and salicornia along desert coasts:
seawater is allowed to fill concrete basins where shrimp live; water from there is used in fish tanks;
[often tilapia and the (boney) milkfish]
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water from the fish tanks flows to fields of salicornia and mangrove trees.
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The mangroves offer wood and leaves that can feed livestock.
The salicornia can be eaten by both livestock and people.

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4/14/2013, 5:29 pm Link to this post Send Email to TheLivingShadow   Send PM to TheLivingShadow Blog
 
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'ANT HILL' permaculture


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The above is a concept i developed yesterday while at the beach where there was a meter of up-swepped fine sand.
Considering arid Moroccan hills i've seen, a basic problem i noticed on the Canaries as well, i came up with the following possible solution.
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The opportunity such hills represent is that even the locals consider them worthless. Geoff Lawton's Palastinian adventure in mind...
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... great things can be accomplished even in areas where rain is infrequent. Arid landscapes are generally caused by the fact that the soil doesn't work like a sponge (which it will with subterranean carbon and life).
There are challenges here, some of which can lead to advantage. Mainly, there are always local livestock roaming the so-called worthless hills. Goats and sheep, however, provide 2 vital components: they harvest grass growing [a basic ley farming component] and they leave manure behind.
This leads to the final ANT component: the bottom of the ant is a circle or oval with vertical walls of 3 meters or more. In this area it'll quickly be possible to start growing vegetables and (at first small) fruit trees safe from local livestock.
These are the steps to ANT HILL PERMACULTURE:
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- grooves that lead to a basin collect water.
- below this reservoir [probably covered with rocks to keep it cool and stop evaporation] terraces are set out.
- when it rains (hard) and even the reservoir and terraces can't absorb all the water, grooves from the terraces guide the water, giving it a place to collect and offer more vegetation a place to grow. These grooves should have tiny dams in them [reminiscent of the parts of the ant's leg] to let the water flow down in steps and have time to seep deep into the ground
- all of the water collected in the reservoir and terraces will slowly fall downhill below ground; this area below the head and body of the ant will be where (initially) more than grass can be grown.

This type of permaculture of course also incorporates use of vegetation that creates underground carbon and can stand arid climates, as well as being resistant to animal life [thorns].
Particularly the use of vetiver grass seems opportune in creating the terraces but also for the steep walls of the ant's rear.
In later stages the edges of the terraces can be covered with mature thorny shurbs and or agave which keep livestock even from reaching them. At this (later) point it'll become possible to grow vegetables and fruit trees on the terraces.
[Obviously all other (permaculture) tricks in keeping soil moist can and should be applied, like terra preta and buried clay pots.]
The essence of this concept is to create a subterranean living sponge that collects every drop of rain that falls, allowing the living organisms to make sure they hold on to the water (which is obviously in their best interest). In time livestock resistent growth will make the area more and more capable of holding onto water and producing interesting crops. By starting with ley farming, the production of good soil is kick-started making use of the challenges typically present in such regions. The area below the terraces can later be expanded, creating a much larger circle; to this end species of vegetation should be planted which will in time form a barrier against livestock. In time, then, the deep rear end of the ant may become less deep or even filled in. Initially, though, the 4 to 5 meter deep vetiver roots may help to establish this option which is so crucial to growing anything other than grass in livestock-infested regions.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 6/20/2013, 9:46 am


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hugelkultur


Heaped up wood covered with earth. The wood doesn't offer much in the way of nutrients but it holds water like crazy.

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