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TEOMCROTE = TEOTWAWKI on steroids! The End Of Mankind's Current Reign Over The Earth takes into account that our ancestors were neither suicidal, stupid, nor our genetic inferiors but still wound up getting wiped off the Earth. Whereas CSER [cser.org: Centre for Study of Existential Risk] tries to PREVENT this dispensation from coming to an end, TEOMCROTE works from the eventuality/possibility/probability that the end our age takes place and what to do then

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compost rules/basics


"The Complete Book of Composting" by J.I. Rodale is at least two inches thick and full of all kinds of test results and stuff. But here's the bottom [sign in to see URL] basic compost pile is built like this:

Plan a compost pile 8 feet long, 4 feet wide, and 4 feet tall.
- Spread brush on the ground for air.
- On top of the brush, spread 6 inches of "green" material (leaves, weeds, vegetable garbage, etc).
- On top of the "green" layer, spread 2 inches of fresh manure (from vegetation eating animals only).
- On top of the manure, spread a "sprinkling" of soil.

Continue layering until the pile reaches at least 4 feet tall. The pile will start "working" and within a few days will reach a temp of over 100 degrees. This will kill all the bad organisms that may have been present and will break everything down. The pile will collapse upon itself and shrink down to about 2 feet tall. After two weeks, turn the pile so that what is on the bottom is now on the top and let sit again for another two weeks.
By the end of the month, you'll have usable compost.
from ][sign in to see URL]

]Mulch vs soil and many other insights.

I loved YouTube vid on making a vegetative compost heap.
She says:
- if pile isn't hot enough, add green material (incl. manure)
- if you start smelling ammonia, add brown material.

][sign in to see URL] compost instructions
#hdra-howto]a list of online resources

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 2/16/2014, 10:06 am
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minerals and other aspects


]This forum thread on 2013 discusses some of the basics (and people's knee-jerk assumptions about it).

][sign in to see URL]:
It's estimated that a human with a compost fork and a watering-can, carefully piling up organic matter with the correct C/N ratio, water content and aeration so that it cooks away at high temperatures and emits jets of steam, can make as much topsoil in a year as nature can make in a century, and nature definitely approves. You can tell when nature's happy, the plants smile at you. When she's not happy you can tell by all the "side-effects". Try it and see. Any gardener can quickly learn to make compost.



Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 12/6/2011, 6:12 pm


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irony and truth about manure vs NPK


Plants inhale carbon dioxide, strip off the carbon, compound it with other minerals and elements to make a carbon compound, and exhale oxygen. You inhale oxygen, attach carbon to it that plants have stripped off, and exhale carbon dioxide. It’s a lovely relationship. That’s the way it works. So when an organic farmer says, “I’m going to put manure on my field,” that’s fine, but it’s going to have to break down, liberate the carbon atom and become an inorganic element—and that element goes into a solution with water, and the plant picks it up. The plant cannot directly pick up organic compounds. It gets tricky, because the whole industry has the wrong name. Everybody thinks that the only good food is food that gets manure put on it. The sad part is that the chemical farmers actually have a more readily available product for the plant. They don’t have very many elements, but at least they are elements that can be used right away.

]source

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worms


#]Worm bin that produces compost tea.
In this vid Peter-Paul explains to Marjory Wildcraft how his worm bin works. It's easy, quick, and produces and compost tea that Peter-Paul says gives amazing growth.
This way of composting is more difficult to harvest but much easier to utilise, plus it gives this amazing compost tea that just runs off/out of it because the bin is at a slight slant.

]How to grow big, fat happy worms and beautiful compost
Once your compost pile with worms gets going, keep it slightly moist, keep it mulched and never let it dry out. Other than checking moisture and mulching it, leave it alone. As time progresses, you will see masses of worms on the surface of the soil after pulling the mulch back. If there are no signs of non-decomposed vegetable matter, add a little more. Put a thin layer of fresh vegetable cuttings on top and re-mulch heavily. If you still see recognizable pieces of non decomposed vegetable matter, cover it back up without adding more vegetables. Keep it heavily mulched. Ideally, when the mound reaches maximum efficiency, you can add a three-gallon bucket of waste every other week and you will only see huge numbers of happy worms partying in moist dark soil.
follow link to read the rest

2 Homemade Organic Fertilizers Anyone Can Make FREE
For good worm castings feed the worms cardboard and hair.

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 10/5/2014, 3:40 pm


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minerals and soil depletion


]Natural [sign in to see URL] Special Report on Ocean Grown.

John Hartman: Well, typically, if you go to a grocery store and buy a tomato, it looks lovely. It can be blemish free, bright red and look so nutritious. But typically, those tomatoes—from a hothouse or even out of the ground—have 12, 14 or 15 elements. Tomatoes are genetically disposed to pick up 56 elements, and it’s always the same 56 in a certain proportion. That’s what tomatoes pick up. Every vegetable and fruit is different, but that’s what tomatoes want. When people buy fruits and vegetables, and take them home and taste them and they taste like cardboard, people say, “What happened?” What happened is that they were completely depleted. They are like virtual food.
Mike: It’s really just a shadow of the original tomato that people should be eating.
Hartman: That’s right, and it brings up an interesting point made first by Dr. Murray, who was really the discoverer of how to use ocean water and minerals to grow food. When you sit down and think about what commercial agriculture has come to and what modern cultivation techniques have come to, you’re not really looking at somebody growing food. What you’re really looking at is a strip-mining operation, because when you grow a crop of corn or wheat or whatever it may be, and you ship that to market, you ship some quantity of elements in a certain proportion and quality off to market. What current practice calls for is that you put back three elements, even though you might have shipped 56 or 74 elements off to market.
Mike: To be specific, when you say “elements” here, you’re using that in a sense of the table of elements?
Hartman: Yes. I’m using that in the chemical sense, but people use the word interchangeably with mineral elements.
Mike: When you say they put three back into the soil, these are the three common components of every commercial fertilizer on the market, right?
Hartman: That’s right: nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus.
Mike: So, farmers can grow something that looks like food, but they’re only putting three elements or minerals back into the ground.

follow link to read the rest

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 1/12/2012, 3:39 pm


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George Altgelt


I loved ]this podcast with George Altgelt. He got into a lot of details concerning soil, like:

- you need enough carbon in the soil to get nitrogen.
- you need 12 x more calcium over magnesium for soil to hold on to nitrogen [you know, the N of NPK; for proteins]
- gypsum [calcium sulfate dihydrate] can help, calcium carbonate won't. One can add sulfur but it takes 6 weeks to break down the calcium carbonates (making both available, i.e. sulfur and calcium, ionically).

Around 30 minutes into it, he mentions that Ca to Mg ratio should be at least 12:1.

He speaks of AVAILABLE calcium in the soil, noting that calcium CARBONATE is not readily accessible for the plant, i.e. the soil can be full of calcium but that doesn't mean your plants are getting enough. To absorb calcium carbonate plants have to excrete carbondioxide through their roots first. This means it is slowly absorbed. Carbonic acids then make minerals soluble in water.

A fast way to add absorbable calcium is through adding gypsum [calcium sulfate dihydrate]. ]Wikipedia:
In the early nineteenth century it was regarded as an almost miraculous fertilizer. American farmers were so anxious to acquire it that a lively smuggling trade with Nova Scotia evolved, resulting in the so-called "Plaster War" of 1812.

][website]

Last edited by TheLivingShadow, 2/14/2012, 8:42 pm


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When to Lime Your Lawn


]Why do lawns need lime and how do you know when you need it? I'll try to answer some of these questions for you. The first fact you should know is why lime is used on lawns. Soil ph is a measure of the soils acidity or alkalinity. If your ph level is below 7.0 then your soil is considered acidic and if it's above that number, it is considered alkaline. A desirable ph level is between 6.0 and 7.0. Lime conditions the soil and will improve the growth of turf and make it healthier. With a good ph factor a lawn has, less of a chance of loss of nutrients and thatch is reduced. Soil acidity increases with an increasing rainfall.

Though this might prove interesting, i've understood that adding magnesium to the soil also raises pH levels, but with the added fertilization aspect of Mg.
So any lime we have can probably be saved for building.

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odorless compost


from ]article on ]OffTheGridNews

If you’re growing plants outside, the easiest way to feed them is with a liquid organic fertilizer. If you’re growing everything inside, you probably don’t want to use one of these because they usually have a strong odor. A way to get nutrients for your plants and avoid the odor is to compost with worms. You can keep a worm compost bin under your sink and solve two problems at once: getting rid of food scraps and feeding your plants.

Here’s how to make an indoor worm bin:

Supplies

■Drill
■Rubbermaid container with lid (not clear)
■Shredded paper
■Screen
■Glue or duct tape

Instructions

■Drill two holes of about ¾ inch across in each side of the container and the top. (Not the bottom)
■Cut a square of screen to fit over the holes and glue or tape into place. (These are air holes)
■Soak the paper until wet, and then wring it out until it is about as damp as a wrung-out sponge.
■Then, add your worms!
Red wrigglers are the best worms for indoor composting. Each ½ pound of worms can eat about a pound of food per day. Don’t feed the worms animal products. Coffee grounds help absorb odor. Keep the worms fed, and occasionally remove the “castings” and add them to your plants.

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ley farming


]online book on Ley Farming (and other ebooks and resources on this website).

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(more on) compost tea


Compost Tea is NOT Created Equal & How to Make the Best Compost Tea

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